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A look at Roy Blunt’s achievements in the health and education field – Newstalk KZRG

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.), the top Republican on the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Health, Education, Labor, and Related Agencies, released the following statement today highlighting several priorities he worked to include in the government funding legislation the Senate is expected to consider this week.

“The medical research community is on the verge of breakthroughs that will transform health care delivery and help millions of people live longer, healthier lives,” said Blunt. “I’m proud that we have been able to establish a sustained, bipartisan commitment to increasing funding for the National Institutes of Health and hope that pattern will continue in the years ahead. This bill also builds on the progress we’ve made toward expanding access to mental health care and addiction treatment. And, it continues to strengthen education programs from early childhood through college and career. It has been an incredible opportunity to work with my colleagues on the subcommittee to prioritize resources for programs that will continue to have a tremendous, positive impact on millions of Americans.”

The bill includes the eighth consecutive funding increase for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), bringing the total increase to $17.4 billion, or 58%, under Blunt’s subcommittee leadership. Blunt has worked to more than quintuple funding for Alzheimer’s disease research.

The bill continues to expand Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics, which Blunt and U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (Mich.) established under the Excellence in Mental Health Act in 2014. The legislation also provides support for suicide prevention and school-based mental health.

Following Are Several of the Key Health, Education, and Workforce Priorities Included in the Bill:

National Institutes of Health: $47.5 billion, an increase of $2.5 billion.

  • Alzheimer’s: The bill includes an increase of $226 million for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias research, bringing total funding to $3.74 billion;
  • Cancer: The bill includes $7.32 billion for the National Cancer Institute, including full funding for the STAR Act, Childhood Cancer Data Registry, and an increase of $150 million for competitive cancer grants;
  • ALS:  The bill includes $75 million, an increase of $50 million, for Accelerating Access to Critical Therapies for ALS (ACT for ALS).

Mental Health:  $5.27 billion, a $803.2 million increase, for mental health research, treatment, and prevention, including:

  • $385 million, an increase of $70 million, for Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics;
  • $512 million for SAMHSA suicide prevention activities, including $439.6 million for the recently launched 9-8-8 Suicide Lifeline, in addition to $62 million provided in P.L. 117-180;
  • $1.01 billion, an increase of $150 million, for the Mental Health Block Grant;
  • $111 million for school-based mental health grants at the Department of Education.

Opioids: The bill includes $4.9 billion, an increase of $296.7 million, for substance use prevention and treatment programs, including:

  • $1.58 billion, an increase of $50 million, for State Opioid Response grants;
  • $2.01 billion, an increase of $150 million, for the Substance Abuse Block Grant;
  • $1.42 billion, an increase of $76 million, for research related to opioids and pain.

Apprenticeship Funding: The bill includes $285 million, an increase of $50 million, to support the apprenticeship program.

Early Education:  The bill includes $20 billion, an increase of $2.8 billion, for the Child Care and Development Block Grant and Head Start.

K-12 Formula Grants: The bill includes an increase of $850 million for Title I grants and an increase of $850 million for IDEA Grants to States.

Pell Maximum Award: The bill includes a $500 increase to the maximum Pell award for a total of $7,395 for the 2023-2024 school year.